So What Else is New? "Today's Rap is Wack," Method Man Says

| 9 Comments

Written By SOHH Reckless

Methodman20080822300x300

This topic has been run over, kicked, drowned and shot more times than I can count.

"The music was way more grounded than it is today," Method Man told The Press Association. "Today, you don't feel the movement. Back then, you felt the movement. I mean, the whole hip-hop movement. Like when Wu-Tang Clan came in, it was like regardless of where we went, people knew who we were. Or if we were in a new city, there was one person who knew who we was, and that would spread to ten more people, and so on and so forth, up until it was, 'Oh, you ain't up on that Wu-Tang stuff? Oh you ain't down homie!'

"Same thing with Cash Money, No Limit, Death Row - it goes on and on, all these movements. You don't have that any more."

Someone's mad that their prime has passed. Did you think Wu-Tang was going to be hot forever? No way…

BUT, when it comes to 90s hip-hop in general, I feel Method to the fullest. I completely understand. But as a rapper, why keep talking about it? I express my nostalgia for 90s hip-hop from time to time, but really it's only to express my contrasting feelings of today's rappers. But I'm not a rapper; I have no place. These MCs are steady bitching and moaning, but all the while they're not taking advantage of the position they're in to make good music. Instead, they do the opposite: they continue to make washed up, wack music. Unless that changes, there is nothing that can be done to change the music situation. With the exception of a few including artists like Kanye, etc, hip-hop is basically finished and isn't ever coming back, so get over it. Either make some music people want to hear or move on with your lives.

In the meantime, I'll continue to do my job and be one of the biggest haters there is. What would I be without corny rappers? Where would I be without Soulja Boy, The Game (who is a good rapper but just an idiot), MIMS, and all those other cornballs? I say keep wack rap and bipolar artists. It makes it more fun for people like me.

However, we do need some balance in the rap game blah blah blah. You've heard it all before.

Method should be proud that he was part of a classic album that made history and influenced the hip-hop scene more than he probably realizes. People still bang 36 Chambers. They still play some of those joints in the club from time to time. Damn. Why aren't n*ggas ever satisified? Be happy with what you did and retire. The end.

[Editor's Note: The views of this blog do not necessarily reflect those of SOHH.com]

9 Comments

dems fightin words

Yo You Really Is A Hater! So You Could Make A Living Writing Your Opinions About Hip Hop, But Any Time An Artist Has An Opinion You HATE! Not Good Journalism! Who Gave You A Job Anyways?!?!?!

Well...Well...Well...We are back to bashing today's hip-hop. Now me being raised in the south, I love southern music, but I would have to agree w/Meth and half of the hip-hop world on this topic. Back in the 90's rap music had a movement and substance. Honestly, you really don't feel the movement anymore. It was a feeling back in the 90's that everyone loved. You felt a strong aura around hip-hop as a whole. Many classic albumns were released in the 90's golden age which proved that hip-hop back then was at it's prime. The Chronic, Doggystyle, Ready to Die, All Eyez On Me, Illmatic, Reasonable Doubt,Southernplayalistikcadillacfunkymusik, Makaveli, Life After Death, 400 Degreez. Right there are 10 certified classic Hip-Hop albumns that we all felt a movement behind. This decade I you can barely even name 3 classic rap albumns with out really giving it some thought. And this decade is damn near behind us. Now, I wouldn't go that far and say that hip-hop is simply dead. Hip-Hop is still alive and kicking. You have an onslaught of youngsta's doing they thang. The old ass rappers really need to just chill and guide the young rappers today, instead of hating. They just mad, cause the rappers today are more than likely making more $$$ then they were, which is only right cause Hip-Hop is a billion $ business now, when it was only a million $ business in the 90's. These days hip-hop is really for the kids, teeny bopper, and teenagers. The 90's hip-hop was catered to practically every age group. But you have to understand the difference between this deacade and last decade. We have seen rappers amass so much $$$$ that today's rap music is fuckin over saturated with cars, bling, $ making it rain in da club. 90's rap was based on grilling the government, police brutatlity towards blacks, single family households, and corrupt cops. Yeah, we had those party and bullshit songs, but you needed them from time to time to keep us smiling. Over time we have seen the rap scene change from unity and gritty, to the bling don't give a fuck bout nobody else but myself era. I love southern music, but Hip-Hop has really lost it's essence in why hip-hop was built in the first place. But, who wants to remain in the same circle. Hip-hop is suppose to move forward and not backwards. I see people trying to bring the 80's clothing back. I personally hated the 80's cloting. We really should leave the past in the past and look towards the future. In conclusion, all the rappers and non-rappers who are hating and saying that hip-hop is dead, how about getting of ur ass and doing something bout it. How about you make your own albumn of what you think the public is lacking or have lost. Instead of hating on the next man, do something about it. I hate people that always complain but dont' want to take action. Either get in the game or keep ya mouth cloesd. And that's Real Talk!

Sohh Reckless kept it 100 tho. We gotta give him credit. We heard it a million times already of the reasons why hip hop was better in the 90's than it is now. At some point we gotta move on. The rappers thats complaining need to make better music and stop whining. Quit hatin on Soulja Boy. He is only doin what he knows to the best of his knowledge. He is doin the music that relates to his experiences and he is connecting with his audience. We are starting to sound like old people who are mad that their time has come and gone, just like your parents or grandparents said hip hop was a barbaric form of music period, even when it was Run DMC and Public Enemy making noise. We must think these things over, seriously. Hip Hop is not digressing. Its only changing. We don't like change because we like the good o'l days.

Well...Well...Well...We are back to bashing today's hip-hop. Now me being raised in the south, I love southern music, but I would have to agree w/Meth and half of the hip-hop world on this topic. Back in the 90's rap music had a movement and substance. Honestly, you really don't feel the movement anymore. It was a feeling back in the 90's that everyone loved. You felt a strong aura around hip-hop as a whole. Many classic albumns were released in the 90's golden age which proved that hip-hop back then was at it's prime. The Chronic, Doggystyle, Ready to Die, All Eyez On Me, Illmatic, Reasonable Doubt,Southernplayalistikcadillacfunkymusik, Makaveli, Life After Death, 400 Degreez. Right there are 10 certified classic Hip-Hop albumns that we all felt a movement behind. This decade I you can barely even name 3 classic rap albumns with out really giving it some thought. And this decade is damn near behind us. Now, I wouldn't go that far and say that hip-hop is simply dead. Hip-Hop is still alive and kicking. You have an onslaught of youngsta's doing they thang. The old ass rappers really need to just chill and guide the young rappers today, instead of hating. They just mad, cause the rappers today are more than likely making more $$$ then they were, which is only right cause Hip-Hop is a billion $ business now, when it was only a million $ business in the 90's. These days hip-hop is really for the kids, teeny bopper, and teenagers. The 90's hip-hop was catered to practically every age group. But you have to understand the difference between this deacade and last decade. We have seen rappers amass so much $$$$ that today's rap music is fuckin over saturated with cars, bling, $ making it rain in da club. 90's rap was based on grilling the government, police brutatlity towards blacks, single family households, and corrupt cops. Yeah, we had those party and bullshit songs, but you needed them from time to time to keep us smiling. Over time we have seen the rap scene change from unity and gritty, to the bling don't give a fuck bout nobody else but myself era. I love southern music, but Hip-Hop has really lost it's essence in why hip-hop was built in the first place. But, who wants to remain in the same circle. Hip-hop is suppose to move forward and not backwards. I see people trying to bring the 80's clothing back. I personally hated the 80's cloting. We really should leave the past in the past and look towards the future. In conclusion, all the rappers and non-rappers who are hating and saying that hip-hop is dead, how about getting of ur ass and doing something bout it. How about you make your own albumn of what you think the public is lacking or have lost. Instead of hating on the next man, do something about it. I hate people that always complain but dont' want to take action. Either get in the game or keep ya mouth cloesd. And that's Real Talk!

No Wonder since pac and biggie died, rap has not been the same.

Two years ago, Benzino and Dave Mays started Hip Hop Weekly. But recent reports are claiming the magazine may be done before it has even really started.

The Source Magazine had become known as the hip-hop bible in its heyday. One of the first successful magazine’s of its kind, the monthly publication featured solid hip hop news, politics, respected album reviews, and served as a general how to guide for hip hop enthusiasts around the world.
The Rise & Fall Of The Hip Hop Bible

Founded in and distributed from the dorm room of college students Dave Mays and Job Shecter in 1988, The Source parlayed its success into TV programs and award shows. But the magazine soon found itself at the bad end of rap feuds, lawsuits, and angry subscribers.

Some argue that Benzino caused The Source’s demise. In 1994, it is said that Zino pressured Mays to include a three-page spread on him and his crew in the magazine. Things really got ugly when Zino performed at The Source Awards when he was virtually unknown to mainstream audiences. Word on the street was that several of the magazine’s editors quit or walked out because of Zino’s alleged bullying ways.

The nail in The Source’s coffin came in 1999 when Made Men received a rating of four and a half mics for their album “Classic Limited Edition.” Apparently, the writer who wrote the review didn’t even exist. Still, The Source had some fans still clinging to the hope that their once heralded magazine would rise to its full potential again.

The proverbial fecal matter began closing in on the fan back in 2002 when Benzino decided it would be a good idea to start a feud with Eminem. Zino slammed Em for being the product of a machine designed to eliminate Blacks and Latinos from hip hop. Diss tracks flew back and forth but with Em being the better MC, he pretty much sealed the deal on The Source’s credibility.

Benzino took his fight with Em from the tracks to the mag, dedicating whole issues to some racist remarks Em allegedly made. Although Benzino was subsequently fired, the magazine was never fully able to regain its status in the game.

With rumors swirling about Benzino’s trading cover slots for collaborations on his album, and the “CEO”/rapper randomly firing employees, the once mighty magazine crumbled into nonexistence. (See article about former Source Editor-in-Chief, Kim Osario’s “tell all” book.)
Dave Mays, Ray Benzino & Hip Hop Weekly

Mays and Benzino took their passion for publications to Hip Hop Weekly. Complete with (at times questionable) exposes, news, and gossip for hip-hop heads, the magazine seemed to be flourishing.

All seemed to be good in HHW land until SOHH, a popular online hip-hop magazine, reported on rumors of brewing financial troubles.

“According to my source, things have not been all that promising over at the HHW offices… which just SOHH happens to be Dave Mays living room,” read the blog. “… I don’t know how far they are with the filing the actual Bankruptcy paperwork.”

Benzino and Mays didn’t waste any time kicking down the reports, slamming them as completely untrue.

“… Dave Mays and Raymond Benzino have been the victim of false rumors for years, but they are not going anywhere and have in fact just recently opened a multi-million dollar facility with offices and state of the art recording studios in Miami. Currently the duo are readying their return to a monthly editorial format to compete directly against XXL, The Source, and Vibe at the beginning of the year with their new title Monsta.”

The question now becomes: When will hip hop magazines stop bickering amongst each other and stick to putting out good, quality news to the masses?

SOHH.COM HAS BEEN PAID OFF TO REMOVE COMMENTS ABOUT HIP HOP WEEKLY OFF THEIR BLOG. YOU GUYS ARE FAKE!!! AND YOU SUCK TOO!!

Two years ago, Benzino and Dave Mays started Hip Hop Weekly. But recent reports are claiming the magazine may be done before it has even really started.

The Source Magazine had become known as the hip-hop bible in its heyday. One of the first successful magazine’s of its kind, the monthly publication featured solid hip hop news, politics, respected album reviews, and served as a general how to guide for hip hop enthusiasts around the world.
The Rise & Fall Of The Hip Hop Bible

Founded in and distributed from the dorm room of college students Dave Mays and Job Shecter in 1988, The Source parlayed its success into TV programs and award shows. But the magazine soon found itself at the bad end of rap feuds, lawsuits, and angry subscribers.

Some argue that Benzino caused The Source’s demise. In 1994, it is said that Zino pressured Mays to include a three-page spread on him and his crew in the magazine. Things really got ugly when Zino performed at The Source Awards when he was virtually unknown to mainstream audiences. Word on the street was that several of the magazine’s editors quit or walked out because of Zino’s alleged bullying ways.

The nail in The Source’s coffin came in 1999 when Made Men received a rating of four and a half mics for their album “Classic Limited Edition.” Apparently, the writer who wrote the review didn’t even exist. Still, The Source had some fans still clinging to the hope that their once heralded magazine would rise to its full potential again.

The proverbial fecal matter began closing in on the fan back in 2002 when Benzino decided it would be a good idea to start a feud with Eminem. Zino slammed Em for being the product of a machine designed to eliminate Blacks and Latinos from hip hop. Diss tracks flew back and forth but with Em being the better MC, he pretty much sealed the deal on The Source’s credibility.

Benzino took his fight with Em from the tracks to the mag, dedicating whole issues to some racist remarks Em allegedly made. Although Benzino was subsequently fired, the magazine was never fully able to regain its status in the game.

With rumors swirling about Benzino’s trading cover slots for collaborations on his album, and the “CEO”/rapper randomly firing employees, the once mighty magazine crumbled into nonexistence. (See article about former Source Editor-in-Chief, Kim Osario’s “tell all” book.)
Dave Mays, Ray Benzino & Hip Hop Weekly

Mays and Benzino took their passion for publications to Hip Hop Weekly. Complete with (at times questionable) exposes, news, and gossip for hip-hop heads, the magazine seemed to be flourishing.

All seemed to be good in HHW land until SOHH, a popular online hip-hop magazine, reported on rumors of brewing financial troubles.

“According to my source, things have not been all that promising over at the HHW offices… which just SOHH happens to be Dave Mays living room,” read the blog. “… I don’t know how far they are with the filing the actual Bankruptcy paperwork.”

Benzino and Mays didn’t waste any time kicking down the reports, slamming them as completely untrue.

“… Dave Mays and Raymond Benzino have been the victim of false rumors for years, but they are not going anywhere and have in fact just recently opened a multi-million dollar facility with offices and state of the art recording studios in Miami. Currently the duo are readying their return to a monthly editorial format to compete directly against XXL, The Source, and Vibe at the beginning of the year with their new title Monsta.”

The question now becomes: When will hip hop magazines stop bickering amongst each other and stick to putting out good, quality news to the masses?

SOHH.COM HAS BEEN PAID OFF TO REMOVE COMMENTS ABOUT HIP HOP WEEKLY OFF THEIR BLOG. YOU GUYS ARE FAKE!!! AND YOU SUCK TOO!!

uggh is sohh.com ever come back online

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by SOHH Reckless published on August 22, 2008 10:00 AM.

"Ether" Mastermind Ron Browz Goes From Dis Record King to ... Roger Troutman, T-Pain, & Snoop? was the previous entry in this blog.

Dummy Diddy Is Officially A Cornball, Talks Pointless In A Pointless Video Blog is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.